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MENOZ

moana water

hello, anyone has some info on how they managed to do so many shots with water simulations in moana?

they all seems pretty detailed sims, i wonder how did they handled the disk space and iterations time for the simulations.

houdini was used? I didn't find may info on google

 

 

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thanks! So proprietary solver, distributed sim.

I wonder what that proprietary solver allowed them to achieve, what are it's strength? Speed? better fluid algorithms? 

What is reasonable to think they needed in particular for this show, that required writing a new solver instead of using one of the others solutions on the market?

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On 2/7/2017 at 3:47 PM, MENOZ said:

What is reasonable to think they needed in particular for this show, that required writing a new solver instead of using one of the others solutions on the market?

Imagine a situation where an artist discovers a notable bug in the middle of production that prevented further progress. If they were using a 3rd party solution, they'd have to wait on hold for the developers to uncover the source, fix it, and send out a patch. 

With in-house proprietary software, you send an email to the guys down the hall, they stop everything, find the bug, and get you a fix by dinner time. 

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Not necessarily. Have a look at the Chaos group. If you find a bug, they try to fix it as soon as possible, often overnight. So 3rd party does not mean you have do deal with Autodesk or Nvidia even if they offer spcial bugfix cuts of the software for special partners :)

Was this solver really written for this show? In most cases a proprietary software has been developed for a special purpose. One such software is Glimpse at AnimalLogic. It was first develped as a fast preview tool and then grow up and is now a full featured renderer. We developed our own hairtool several years ago because there were no such solution at this time. It is now tightly integrated into our pipeline and even if there are now equal or better solutions on the market we will stay with our tool becaus a switch would be expensive and need a complete new approach. I suppose it is the same here.

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On 10/2/2017 at 3:31 AM, LukeLetellier said:

Imagine a situation where an artist discovers a notable bug in the middle of production that prevented further progress. If they were using a 3rd party solution, they'd have to wait on hold for the developers to uncover the source, fix it, and send out a patch. 

With in-house proprietary software, you send an email to the guys down the hall, they stop everything, find the bug, and get you a fix by dinner time. 

Well to be honest, in the current state of technology I would prefer to use out of the box solvers rather than in-house solutions.

Companies like SideFX that takes customer support seriously can offer a better support than internal RnD departments.

Getting a fix by the dinner, mmmm that is not usually the case :)

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I loved the water washing up on the beach they did. There's a great article about PIXAR doing a similar effect in the Piper Short.

https://www.fxguide.com/featured/the-tech-of-pixar-part-1-piper-daring-to-be-different/

They appear to be doing it wholly in Houdini's FLIP solver, using curves to generate velocities for art direct-ibility.

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