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danteA

Pin Table

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Wow, that's pretty cool. And it seems that od[force] is having quite some influence on the SESI site ;)

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[Delete this post please]

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it is a nice piece of work and things in 5.5 do make the effect easier than it was back in 4.### [have to love VOPs]

i still haven't seen you guys come up with a way to handle the pins which represent gemometry like the statue of liberty[arm, crown], and the bridge. these pins floated above the table surface when tiggered. it was a cheat which broke the comparison with those desktop toys of pin reliefs.

straight displacement from a image won't help you there. but as i said before the power of houdini will allow a user to achieve the same effect in number of different methods.

i'd can't disclose how we did it. but you guys have come so far.. it would be a shame not to go all the way. so i guess i'm setting the challenge a bit higher now.

-k

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Can't you do it with second map file ?? one for displacement and one for transformation in Y.

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the kenny wrote:

"come up with a way to handle the pins which represent gemometry like the statue of liberty[arm, crown], and the bridge"

challenge accepted :)

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statue of liberty[arm, crown], and the bridge. these pins floated above the table surface when tiggered. it was a cheat which broke the comparison with those desktop toys of pin reliefs.

AAARGHH...yea!

I thought about these guys right after the movie was out....that's why (at the time) I thought of voxels! but then again the displacement tricks worked well enough, I *chose* to forget about it... ;)

I think you could generate vertical cross-sections of your modelled objects at regular intervals (think visible human), and then break down every contour into squre profiles (think quantization)...then extrude every profile laterally by an amount equal to the cross-section spacing...

kinda gets rid of the top/down approach...

don't have the specifics, though.....

I'm curious, is the method still subject to an NDA?

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Why not just have fixed length pins that rise to the requested height? You could vary the length according to your geometry.

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i still haven't seen you guys come up with a way to handle the pins which represent gemometry like the statue of liberty

How about Delete SOP?

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sirogi wrote:

"I think you could generate vertical cross-sections of your modelled objects at regular intervals (think visible human), and then break down every contour into squre profiles (think quantization)...then extrude every profile laterally by an amount equal to the cross-section spacing..."

yes yes, was thinking something similar *visible human*...but i havent seen the effect in awhile (since i saw it in the theatres)....gonna have to watch it again ;)

danteA - could possibly take geometry, pass rays through the bottom of the model and fill it from there...*kinda like a casting a mold* ..is that what you mean? would be clever :)

Mike C.

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danteA - could possibly take geometry, pass rays through the bottom of the model and fill it from there...*kinda like a casting a mold* ..is that what you mean?  would be clever :)

Actually, I didn't really think it through and now I realize the sirogi's idea is the best I can think of too. (I didn't consider geometry that had hollow spaces in them before.) Ray the grid points onto your geometry using farthest intersection. Copy stamp boxes to all the rayed points at the corresponding height. Now boolean/cookie intersect these copied boxes with the original geometry. This gives you the pins required to animate up and down. Now you have to somehow figure out which boxes correspond to which pin though, which I have no idea how.

dante

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Hehheh. I use Ray SOP to solved mine. Which was why I finally realized how freaking awesome Ray SOP was. :) Now just need to figure something else out with it.

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Why not just have fixed length pins that rise to the requested height? You could vary the length according to your geometry.

...because that would leave holes where the pins were.... besides, who said you only have one overhang in the geometry, maybe there is more

than one..... needing more than one pin stacked vertically....

cheers!

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sirogi:

holes in the table could easily be covered up. but yeah, like I said in the above reply that I didn't consider hollows inside the geometry.

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whoops...replied before looking at your last post...all good.

guess there were 36 ways to skin a cat with the old houdini, and 3600 with the new one! :)

Cheers!

(sorry 'bout the cat thing, eh Jens? ) :P

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Don't tell me...

Aside from figuring out the pin table, you guys also found various way to skin that poor...

...

......

...........

...Just kidding.

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Think it's easy to build a hexagon table??? Well, now that we know the answer, of course it is, but getting there took a little time, for whatever reason.

In spirit of that, try the hex grid table SOP (optype) attached.

SOP_hexgrid.zip

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Hope you don't mind - I posted this up on odforce's codex. I love .optypes!

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