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JonathanGranskg

Windows: Render hangs

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This is something I'm experiencing at work and I'm wondering if anyone has had a similar problem and if you have any solutions.

 

Sometimes when I put on an overnight render at work and come back the next day I notice that the render has stopped on a certain frame, render dialog still open and timer ticking. Task Manager tells me the processor is running at a very low percentage so Houdini is clearly not calculating anything. 

To give an example, I left a render on over the weekend and when I came back it had stopped at frame 17 with 69 hours spent and the processor runs at 5%. I interrupt the render and restart it and it renders past that in just 30 minutes. As you can imagine, this is very annoying. 

 

This has also happened to me at home when I used to use Windows. Has anyone else experienced this?

 

Windows 7 64-bit, rendering out .exr-sequences 

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I have experienced similar issues when rendering on OSX. The culprit for me was power saving. Turn all that crap off. Turn off screen saver and make sure the computer never, ever, ever goes to sleep. OSX recently introduced AppNap, yet another way for the system to determine if a program is really running. You can turn that off on a per-app basis.

Edited by Atom

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Guest mantragora

Go to:

Control Panel\Hardware and Sound\Power Options

set it to High Perfomance and see if it helps.

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Guest tar

can you try with Verbose turned on?  then you can see a log where it's stopping

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Guest tar

Perhaps it's Netrinos then :) Make sure you're are using ECC memory

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECC_memory

 

'Electrical or magnetic interference inside a computer system can cause a single bit of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) to spontaneously flip to the opposite state. It was initially thought that this was mainly due to alpha particles emitted by contaminants in chip packaging material, but research[2] has shown that the majority of one-off soft errors in DRAM chips occur as a result of background radiation, chiefly neutrons from cosmic ray secondaries, which may change the contents of one or more memory cells or interfere with the circuitry used to read/write them.'

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