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anthonymcgrath

tree destruction - getting that "bendyness" into it ?

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Posted (edited)

hey chaps, been a while since i was on here but i've been keeping myself busy!

i'm having a little problem with my setup... i've got a tree (modelled in speedtree) and i've brought it into houdini.  I've done a pre transform fracture to get 'splintery' pieces.

I've set it up so a ball hits it (its a dragon in my scene but its quite heavy geo so dont want to include it!).

now overall it 'works' ...as in the ball fractures the tree on impact.

But its just lacking that splintery 'connected bendy' feel... eg if you load the sim and play it you'll see the lower half just kinda crumbles away... It would be nice for that to bend in the direction of the impact as if the tree itself is bendy - right now it feels like crumbling chunks of brick that all break apart - it would be nice to get some kind of bendyness in any branches that stay together?

another thing is the pieces seem to lack some sort of 'inherit velocity' from the impact.


I've followed a heap of tuts online but i just cant figure anything out - is anyone able to take a look at my scene (attached) and see if anything is possible?

ta!
ant
 

scene included below - tree alembic also included.... i will shower you in MAOAMS sweetys if you can help me with this scene because i'm really lost :(
tree_destruction.zip




dragon_stg01__00300_.thumb.jpg.0894200a8df8c9045725d1429bcc3892.jpg

Edited by anthonymcgrath

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Posted (edited)

Hi,

Maybe an idea is to do it in two times :

- a first where the tree isn’t broken into pieces / splinters, and maybe even just a proxy geo that you simulate with FEM, with the roots attached on the ground and your collision object to give the deformation.

- then a second that starts during the first sim, at a point in time where you like the « bendyness » of your FEM tree, but using a fractured version of your tree at this step of the first simulation, using classic RBD with maybe some spring constraints to keep some « bendyness » and fluidity in the fracture...

Hope this helps, although I did not opened the file (running out of time...)

Edited by StepbyStepVFX

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21 minutes ago, StepbyStepVFX said:

Hi,

Maybe an idea is to do it in two times :

- a first where the tree isn’t broken into pieces / splinters, and maybe even just a proxy geo that you simulate with FEM, with the roots attached on the ground and your collision object to give the deformation.

- then a second that starts during the first sim, at a point in time where you like the « bendyness » of your FEM tree, but using a fractured version of your tree at this step of the first simulation, using classic RBD with maybe some spring constraints to keep some « bendyness » and fluidity in the fracture...

Hope this helps, although I did not opened the file (running out of time...)

hi thanks for the reply - that kind of makes sense actually yeah... i'm fairly ok with FEM setups so i reckon i can do that.


another vid i watched was this... i'm trying to connect my leaves to my chunks of fractured bark but not having much luck :/  there has to be easier ways!
 

 

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In case you hadn't already seen it, there was this post recently that mentioned using cone twist constraints for a bending-type effect in splintering wood, perhaps that might help

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5 hours ago, ryew said:

In case you hadn't already seen it, there was this post recently that mentioned using cone twist constraints for a bending-type effect in splintering wood, perhaps that might help

Hey thanks I didn't find this. I did a search on here but dunno how I missed this.

I added a  cone twist constraint into mine but it didn't appear to do much. I'll try what there suggesting with substeps and other values.. May get lucky!

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