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concept4

Mist with Voxels?

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Hi all. I'm the new one around here. Siggraph and Digital Domain's friendly employees have convinced me to take a break from maya and eat up houdini. So far I love it and I've explored quite a bit of it in a few days. Now I'm trying to do an effect that involves gushing water coming down a city street. While I look things up and try various things I'm wondering what kind of input and advice I can get off here. I'm looking for a good way shading method to make a thick water mist. I like what I see so far with image3d. Is this the best option for the volumetric mist? I'll take any other tips for the particles or whatever else you all can think off. :)

Thanks

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It depends on exactly what you're looking for. If you need to see plumes of self shadowing mist with objects legitimately buried within, then i3d is the way to go. If you just need to see a fog drifting in front of or between objects, then there are many simpler, less expensive ways to achieve this (compositing tricks, etc.).

stu

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well, I'm going for the look of the water horses in the first lord of the rings. The only thing the wave will interact with is the reconstructed matchmoved scenary in the shot.

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try using large particle scales, and use i3ds with lots of detail in them. the animation will be easier to controll, and the interpenetration of the particles will make it look like you have lots of stuff going on.

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Now when you say scale I assume you mean the pscale attribute of the particle. Does this directly influence the size of the metaballs that are used in the rendering of the i3d files?

So far I've got the main set of particles that come in like a wave and crash against the wall and flip over to the other side towards tha camera quite nicely. Now I'm about to setup the filler from the ground to the wave. Before I try what I have in mind I'd like some input on some good ways to birth the particles from a leading edge on the ground and make them rise to the location of the wave that's coming in overhead.

Thanks for the tips so far.

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